News

New research identifies huge opportunity for struggling businesses during COVID-19

New research identifies huge opportunity for struggling businesses during COVID-19

Katherine Mechanicos - Tuesday, June 30, 2020

With the majority of Australian businesses losing revenue and closing their doors due to the impact of COVID-19 nationwide lockdown, new research into multilingual consumer buying habits offers new hope for businesses.

LanguageLoop, who have been providing interpreting and translation services to multilingual communities across Australia for over 40 years, has surveyed 3,000 multilingual consumers and found huge commercial opportunities for businesses who simply offer their services in multiple languages.

With five million+ Australians speaking a...

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Fair Dinkum Slang Confusing Overseas Cobbers

Fair Dinkum Slang Confusing Overseas Cobbers

Frans Moens - Monday, October 21, 2019

IN THE NEWS - Following on from the Herald Sun article, listen to the fantastic FIVEaa Alan Hickey radio interview – “Fair Dinkum Slang Confusing Overseas Cobbers” with our CEO Elizabeth Compton here.

“For migrants whose second language is English, Aussie slang can be very confronting. Alan Hickey spoke with Elizabeth Compton (CEO - LanguageLoop) about some of the terms that confuse or amuse our overseas cobbers” .

https://soundcloud.com/fiveaa/alan-hickey-fair-dinkum-slang-confusing-overseas-cobbers

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Aussie Slang Can Prove A Fair Drinkum Drag For Migrants.

Aussie Slang Can Prove A Fair Drinkum Drag For Migrants.

Frans Moens - Tuesday, October 15, 2019

IN THE NEWS - A poll of nearly 3000 new Australians has revealed the most amusing and misunderstood Aussie sayings.

“G’day” topped the list with ­migrants sometimes misinterpreting the true blue greeting as “God Day”, “get aye” and even “get hay”.

“Mate”, “good on ya”, “how ya going?”, “she’ll be right”, “bloody oath” and “fair dinkum” — frequently heard as “fair drinkum” — were also terms migrants found especially amusing and hardest to fathom.

“No worries”, “grog” and “grouse” (which...

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